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Something Wild: The bittersweet reprise of birdsong in fall

Dave Anderson, Chris Martin, Jessica Hunt | September 9, 2022

Are you missing the dawn chorus?

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Wildlife
A brownish toad blends into log against green backdrop on Floodplain in August 2022

A Tiny Mystery — Warts and All

Ellen Kenny, Dave Anderson | August 31, 2022

What's the deal with all those toads?!

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Wildlife
Paddler's view of an orange kayak with clipboard in the ocean

A Successful Cleanup Day at Sagamore Creek

Sophie Oehler | August 16, 2022

The team collected 151 items of garbage, all of which weighed in at 23.5 pounds.

Students pose for a group photo in the shade of silver maple forest

Free Play In Nature — We ALL Learn

Dave Anderson | July 21, 2022

A tradition continued when English Language Learners/campers returned to the floodplain to explore the Merrimack River.

red coat of summer deer doe contrasts green wetlands vegetation

Summertime... and the living is easy?

Dave Anderson, Ellen Kenny | July 15, 2022

How wildlife "makes hay while the sun shines."

Tags:
Wildlife
A group of staff and community members pose at the entrance to the Ammonoosuc River Forest.

Celebrating Protection of the Ammonoosuc River Forest

Anna Berry | July 12, 2022

A new angler access trail opened July 9.

Tags:
Wildlife
yellow and black goldfinch eating red mulberries against blue sky and green leaves

Wildlife Wednesday: Summer along the Merrimack River in Concord

Dave Anderson, Ellen Kenny | July 6, 2022

Birds and plants have co-evolved to mutually benefit: trading carbohydrates for seed distribution via fruits which birds consume and pass seeds to far-flung locations where they might germinate.

Tags:
Wildlife
An aerial view of the spongy moth defoliation shows some green trees against the backdrop of mountains with an expanse of brown trees.

Something Wild: A spongy moth infestation is plaguing New Hampshire forests, again

Dave Anderson, Chris Martin, Jessica Hunt | July 1, 2022

In certain parts of the state, you can’t miss the invasive caterpillars munching their way through the forest, just as they did last summer.