Forest Society News & Features

A 10-year trend shows New England losing forest cover in expanding urban areas -- where development is permanent and rarely reverts back to forest.

DURHAM, N.H. —New Hampshire public opinion appears to have shifted narrowly against the controversial Northern Pass project to deliver 1,090 megawatts of Canadian-generated hydro power to New England via nearly 200 miles of transmission lines that would cut through the Granite State.

By the end of the meeting that more than two dozen residents attended, Barry estimated about $600 had been donated.

This was the second time in a week residents have weighed in on hiring an attorney. 

Jamie Sayen could be the bravest man in Coos County. Why? Sayen had

the courage to tell the truth about what Eversource is doing to his area.

These days we’re flashing back to when people reacted with shock and anger to the initial proposal for the Northern Pass transmission line, as its recent alignment with the hoped-for Balsams redevelopment and the push for its Forward NH Fund have sparked a whole new wave of protest.

There was the recent announcement by Eversource Energy, the developer, that contractors had been signed to build the project. Although a primary sales pitch for Northern Pass has been the New Hampshire jobs it will create, the retained companies are not local.

The Kinder Morgan natural gas pipeline project is dead — a victim of low energy prices and a lack of interest by natural gas shippers and buyers. 

The following op-ed by Forest Society Board of Trustees Chair William Webb and President/Forester Jane A. Difley was published in various newspapers over the last few weeks.